2dr Fleetside Pickup 6-cyl. 250cid/155hp 1bbl
$7,600 Avg. Value*

Model Overview

History of the 1967-1972 Chevrolet C/K Series Pickup

Building on the successful first series of C/K pickup, Chevrolet launched a revised version in 1967. Coil springs remained at all four corners beneath the restyled 1967 Chevy C10, but a crisp, clean pickup appeared on the outside, and in some opinions the new Chevy looked even more modern than its half-ton Ford rival, which was also updated that year. Both Stepside and Fleetside availability carried over from 1966, and revised grilles continued to represent new model-year calling cards up through 1972.

The 1967 and 1968 model years are each unique for a few reasons. The 1967 C/K trucks had a small rear window and the cleaner look of no side marker lights, while the 1968 C/K pickups continued to use the grille integrated with the front fascia yet with the minimally visually intrusive side marker lights and a large back window. The 1969 and 1970 C10 and K10 models look for all the world alike without knowledge of the various trim levels. More importantly, though, is that the 1969 model year was the first to feature the ubiquitous 350-cid Chevy small-block V-8 (an option), replacing the previous year’s superb 327. The 1970 model saw the introduction of the Mark IV big block in 402 cid (although marketed and badged this year only as a 400). The 1971 and 1972 Chevy pickups tend to be the most popular, with a shared large egg crate grille and further refinements such as front disc brakes.

A host of trim packages emerged during this generation, and serve as rolling proof that some truck buyers indeed preferred their pickups to play as well as work. New for 1967 was the Custom Sport Truck (CST), which saw car-like features such as a cigarette lighter, bright trim inside and out (including on the gas pedal), and plush carpeting come standard. Bucket seats were also available. An even flashier Cheyenne model overshadowed the CST in 1971 and in turn was upstaged midyear by the upscale Cheyenne Super. All Chevy pickups were treated to standard front disc brakes in 1971. Power assist was optional for the C10 half-ton, but standard for the heavier pickups.

Today, this generation of Chevrolet C10 and K10 are some of the most loved collector trucks extant, and for good reason. They are drop-dead gorgeous, have timeless styling, possess good build quality, and are easily drivable in modern traffic. Furthermore production numbers were large and they were home to several of the same engines used in popular Chevy cars, meaning maintenance, restoration, and upgrades are all relatively easy endeavors. All years of this generation of Chevy pickup were offered with either a stamped steel box floor or wood planking. When they were new working trucks, the steel floors tended to be more popular, but today a wood bed truck brings a premium in the market.

1969 chevrolet c10 1/2 ton Info

  • Body Styles
  • 2dr Fleetside Pickup
  • 2dr Panel Truck
  • 2dr Stepside Pickup
  • 2dr Fleetside Long Bed
  • 2dr Stepside Long Bed
  • Engine Types
  • 6-cyl. 250cid/155hp 1bbl
  • 8-cyl. 307cid/200hp 2bbl
  • 6-cyl. 292cid/170hp 1bbl
  • 8-cyl. 396cid/310hp 4bbl
  • 8-cyl. 350cid/255hp 4bbl
  • Number Produced
  • 54,211